Vegan in Prague – Experience and City Review

Vegan in Prague – Experience and City Review

 

A vegan travel guide to Prague, one of the best cities in Europe to explore vegan food.

 

From cruises along the Vltava River to evenings in the Old Town Square, Prague is a fairytale city and an incredibly laid back and beautiful place to visit. It effortlessly draws all visitors into its enchanted web of wonder. Prague is one of the worlds most beautiful cities; picturesque, magical and going to sweep you off your feet. The city is magically bohemian, alternative and gorgeous! The people are very sweet and courteous, and Prague is also unbelievably vegan-friendly! Before planning a trip to Prague, be sure to check Expedia.com for information on travel restrictions to the Czech Republic. If you do decide to visit Prague, then you may want to consider getting travel insurance.

 

Prague historic tram, public transportation

 

Did you know Prague is home to a number of famous cultural attractions, many of which survived the violence and destruction of 20th century Europe? During my travels I came across this great website called freetour.com. Very friendly, helpful and knowledgeable guides. You will support students who are happy to practice their English with you while getting to know the city. I highly recommend it! The main attractions and my favorites are the Charles Bridge, the Old Town Square with the Prague Astronomical Clock, the Jewish Quarter, the Petřín Hill and the Lenten Park Viewpoint.

 

Charles Bridge, a medieval stone arch bridge that crosses the Vltava river, Prague, Czech Republic

 

Czech cuisine has both influenced and been influenced by the cuisines of surrounding countries and nations. Enjoying a moderate climate, the Czech Republic can locally produce most of its agricultural products, which find their way into delicious dishes in its capital Prague. Due to its traditional culinary offerings, visiting the Czech Republic as a vegan may still be a challenge. However, this is not the case in the capital city of Prague. Many restaurants are designed to cater completely for vegans. In fact, the capital of the Czech Republic is a vegan paradise. Despite the fact that Czech cuisine is all about stewed meats, dumplings, and heavy sauces vegan and vegan-friendly restaurants have been popping up all over Prague. A whopping 50+  vegan restaurants!  It is inspiring to see how creative vegan restaurant owners/chefs can be with their own unique take on local and international cuisine.



Booking.com

 

Cabbage Schnitzel at Moment Bistro, Prague

Originally a Hungarian dish, goulash found its way into Czech cuisine over time, and today it is as popular as ever, typically prepared in winter. Sauerkraut and dumplings are Czech classics. For dessert I tried Míša řezy, a traditional Czech dessert with coconut quark as the main ingredient. So dobrou chuť! Which can best be translated as “Bon appétit”.

Vegan Míša řezy, a traditional Czech dessert

 

Prague is surrounded by hills and low mountains forming part of the Bohemian Massif. Prague is known as the ‘City of a Hundred Spiresbecause of its beautiful cathedrals and their pointy spires. But you could just as easily call it the City of a Hundred Bridges. According to Prague.net, there are over three hundred bridges in the city. Eighteen of them span the Vltava River. Hundreds more cross many smaller rivers, creeks and valleys. 

 

Wenceslas Square in the New Town of Prague

If it’s your first time in Prague and you’re staying for just a few days, then the Old Town or New Town is definitely the most convenient place to stay. And for a little highlight book a room in one of the boat hotel for a little Vltava river Cruise vibe. You can search for accommodations in the Old Town on Expedia.com or Booking.com. Check out some of the top-rated hotels with a bit of a bohemian twist.


Summary: Traveling as a vegan in Prague is very convenient with plenty of vegan local and international cuisine available and several organic supermarkets with a wide range of vegan products. It is also perfect for nature lovers. A great city to live in for the long term, as the standard of living is on a par with its larger neighbours at comparatively lower prices. It also has a large expat and vegan community plus an excellent public transport system. Prague has so much to offer, and I know it won’t be my last visit!

 

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Vegan in Krakow – Experience and City Review

Vegan in Krakow – Experience and City Review

A vegan travel guide to Krakow (Cracow), one of the best cities in Europe to explore vegan food.

You wouldn’t believe it at first glance, but Poland is a vegetarian’s paradise and for that reason alone a country that must be visited. Not only will you be surprised by the extensive vegan cuisines, but you are also transported into a fairytale – cobblestone streets, a mix of Renaissance, Baroque and Gothic architecture, a sprawling Market Square, and an imposing castle. Before planning a trip to Krakow, be sure to check Expedia.com for information on travel restrictions to the Poland. If you do decide to visit Krakow, then you may want to consider getting travel insurance.

Wawel Royal Castle, Krakow

This time I’m headed to Krakow in the south of Poland, Lesser Poland Province also known as Małopolska. Krakow is famous for its mediaeval old town. In those days, it was the national capital, but it is now the second city of Poland behind Warsaw. Krakow’s Old Town is a charming jewel of UNESCO World Heritage and one of the first in the world to be so recognised. Austria, Hungary, Turkey, the Czech Republic and Germany have all influenced Kraków’s cuisine in the past due to their shared history. As well as being a cultural capital, Krakow is also a culinary hub, where you can try vegan dishes from all over the world.



Booking.com

 

International cuisine, Krakow

But of course, you must try the typical Polish dishes. Pierogi, Polish dumplings, are a staple food for most Krakowians, and the go-to type is ruskie (Russian), which are stuffed with cheese and potato. Pierogi are usually boiled, savory, and served with sour cream, but you’ll also find fried and sweet versions. A typical cheesecake from Kraków, sernik krakowski, is served for dessert. Vegan versions are so easy to find.

Veganised local cuisine, Krakow

It is estimated the majority of the population identifies as Catholic Christians. Roman Catholic fasting rituals have had a strong influence on Polish food traditions. During the fasts no meat is eaten, so many meatless and fish dishes have become a part of Polish cookery.

Krakow Markets

The natural landscape features many historic sites. and four national parks and numerous reserves have been established in the voivodeship to protect the environment of Lesser Poland. You can find incredible vegan food and accommodation at half the price of major European cities. The Old Town and the Jewish Quarter (Kazimierz) are the two most important architectural features of the city and are a must see for tourists. During my travels I came across this great website called freetour.com. Very friendly, helpful and knowledgeable guides. You will support students who are happy to practice their English with you while getting to know the city. I highly recommend it!

 

 

Krakow Jewish Quarter © Maricel Lukkanit

If it’s your first time in Prague and you’re staying for just a few days, then the Jewish Quarter (Kazimiers) and Old Town are definitely one of the most convenient place to stay. You can search for accommodations at the Jewish Quarter on Expedia.com or Booking.com. Check out some of the top-rated charming hotels.

Kazimiers Secrets Apartment

Hotel Rubenstein

Apartment Bonerowka 

I also highly recommend the “Vegan Passport”, a small booklet with a short, detailed explanation of what vegan means and what vegans can eat in over 70 languages. This can be very helpful, especially if you are traveling for a prolonged period of time and your hands and feet are no longer sufficient.

Krakow has a lot to offer and I was really impressed and surprised by the abundance of vegan food and fresh produce availability as well as the lush nature of the city.

 

 

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Yellow Curry with Potatoes

One of our most popular recipes from our Vegan Crush Meal Prep Cookbook, this recipe gives you all the convenience of eating out at a Thai restaurant in the comfort of your own home. Serve over freshly boiled potatoes, brown rice or quinoa and your family will be raving about this delicious vegan meal for days to come.

This recipe calls for peppers, eggplant and broccoli, all of which are typical of a classic yellow curry. But don’t let that limit your creativity! If you have other vegetables on hand – especially anything that might go off quickly – feel free to add them. This recipe calls for a can of full-fat coconut milk, which is key to the dish. Note that canned coconut milk is very different from the coconut milk you’ll find in the fridge aisle, which is made for drinking. That won’t work here. You need this super-creamy, thick coconut milk to make a curry that matches the decadence of the yellow curries you’ll find in an authentic Thai restaurant.

The star of the show is yellow curry paste. You can find yellow curry paste in the Asian section of most grocery stores – just check the ingredients to make sure there are no shrimp or shellfish.

More Vegan Stew and Curry Recipes

 

Yellow Curry with Potato

Course dinner, lunch, Main Course
Cuisine asian, Thai
Servings 2

Ingredients
  

  • 100 g Eggplant cut in cubes
  • 100 g red bell pepper cut in cubes
  • 100 g broccoli cut in small florets
  • 2 Tbsp yellow curry paste
  • 250 g coconut milk
  • 1 tsp sea salt to taste
  • 1 tsp brown sugar to taste
  • 1 piece lemon

Instructions
 

  • In a pan add the curry paste and heat for a few seconds. Add the coconut milk and let simmer for 30seconds while stirring.
  • Add the rest of the ingredients and let cook for 10min or until vegetables are wilted.
  • Serve curry over boiled potatoes, brown rice or quinoa and sprinkle with freshly squeezed lemon.
Keyword dairy-free, gluten-free, vegan, vegetarian

 

Easy Vegan Borek in a Pan

Vegan Borek with Tofu and Carrots

Who knew authentic Turkish borek could be so easy to make vegan in a pan? This vegan borek recipe only uses simple ingredients that you can find at your local grocery store.

An excellent dish that is quick and simple to prepare, it can be eaten hot or cold and they’re very versatile too. Grab-and-go breakfast, afternoon snack, travel snack, or pre- or post-workout fuel. 

 

For those of you who like to prepare meals in advance, borek keeps well in the fridge and can be frozen. You’ll need one package of yulfka dough which you can easily find in a Turkish supermarket. As an alternative, you can use phyllo dough to make this recipe, which you can find in the grocery store’s frozen section. Be sure to thaw it in the fridge overnight.

 

A classic in the traditional borek recipe is Turkish feta cheese. Shredded vegetables such as spinach, carrots, potatoes, cabbage or a combination with tofu, which I used in this recipe, can be used for a vegan borek version. 

 

Turkish Borek with Tofu and Carrots

Course dinner, lunch, Snack
Cuisine balkanese, central asia, middle eastern, turkish

Equipment

  • 1 non stick pan 27 diameter
  • 1 baking brush

Ingredients
  

  • 500 g yufka dough or phylo dough 4 sheets
  • 100 g firm tofu shredded
  • 100 g carrots shredded
  • 1-2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 1 Tbsp chakalaka spice mix
  • 300 g plant-based milk
  • 200 g filtered water
  • 3 Tbsp chickpea flour
  • 2 Tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp black and white sesame seeds optional

Instructions
 

  • In a pan add a bit of oil and combine shredded carrots and tofu. Let cook for a few minutes until carrots are wilted. Season with lemon juice, salt and your choice of spice blend. Transfer to a bowl and let cool.
  • Prepare the liquid by combining the milk, water and chickpea flour in a bowl. Whisk to corporate. The consistency is watery which we want.
  • In a non stick diameter 27cm pan add 2 Tbsp of oil. Now add the first dough sheet. Lay a second layer of phyllo on top of the first, covering every part of the sheet pan. Pour 3-4 tablespoons of the milk mixture over the sheets, and use a pastry brush to spread it evenly over the dough.
  • Now add the cooled sautéed veggies and spread evenly. Add the next sheet and moisture with the milk wash by using the brush. Now add the last sheet and brush the last top of the assembled pastry with an even layer of the remaining milk mixture. If any sheets are hanging over the side of the pan, fold them in toward the pastry’s center. Be sure to brush this extra dough with the milk mixture. At this point, your borek should look moist and tightly packed. Sprinkle with black and white sesame.
  • Now start cooking on low heat with the lid on for about 8-13minutes or until golden brown. Turn your borek with tofu and carrots in a pan upside down with an aid of pan lid and cook also the other side.
Keyword plant-based, vegetarian

Cultured Cashew Yoghurt – Papaya Boat

Papaya Boat filled to the brim with homemade vegan cashew yoghurt.  It is easier than you might think! 

This filled papaya boat with cashew yoghurt is raw, vegan, gluten-free, full of probiotics & protein and is totally delicious and a lot of fun to make. The recipe is super easy, and it requires only minimal active hands-on preparation time

 

Many brands of probiotics come in capsule form. Simply open the capsules and pour the content into your cashew paste to use as a starting culture. Look for brands that are labeled “dairy-free” or “vegan,”.

A finished yoghurt can also be used as a starter for your next batch. If you have never made yoghurt before, you can use store-bought yoghurt instead. There are numerous dairy-free yoghurt brands available today, including those made from coconut milk, almonds, cashew, and so on. Save a small amount of yoghurt to use as a starter for your first batch. This concept generally works well, and then you’ll just save a bit from the new batch and so on.

Creamy, tangy, thick and simply delicious. Happy creating!

Cultured Cashew Yoghurt

Course Breakfast, Dessert

Equipment

  • Blender
  • bowl

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup raw cashews soaked overnight
  • 1 cup filtered water
  • 1 Tbsp vegan yoghurt or starter

Instructions
 

  • Place the cashews and water in a blender and blend to a very smooth paste.
  • Place the cashew paste in a ceramic or glass bowl. Stir in the starter or vegan yoghurt. Cover the bowl with cling wrap and place in a warm spot, like a cold oven with the pilot light on, or, in hotter temps, on the countertop.
  • Let it stand for six hours or overnight. The set yoghurt should be very thick and tangy.
  • Slice a papaya in half lengthwise and scoop out the papaya seeds. Fill the empty space with yoghurt and top with fruits, nuts or whatever your heart desires.
Keyword dairy-free, raw vegan, gluten-free, vegetarian, vegan
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